Atherosclerosis and age

Pin1 Shares 24 Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular condition that affects individuals who are middle-aged and older. Atherosclerosis is a hardening and narrowing of arteries due to a build-up of cholesterols, fats, and other substances on the inside of arterial walls. Atherosclerosis can reduce blood flow to the heart and brain and cause a number of different serious health complications including heart attacks, strokes, and aneurysms. Luckily, there are many simple lifestyle tips individuals can follow to prevent atherosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis and age

High blood pressure High amounts of sugar in the blood due to insulin resistance or diabetes Plaque may begin to build up where the arteries are damaged.

Over time, plaque hardens and narrows the arteries. Eventually, an area of plaque can rupture break open. They may clump together to form blood clots. Clots narrow the arteries even more, limiting the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body.

Depending on which arteries are affected, blood clots can worsen angina chest pain or cause a heart attack or stroke.

Researchers continue to look for the causes of atherosclerosis. They hope to find answers to questions such as: Why and how do the arteries become damaged?

How does plaque develop and change over time? Why does plaque rupture and lead to blood clots? Risk Factors The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known.

However, certain traits, conditions, or habits may raise your risk for the disease.

Atherosclerosis: Your Arteries Age by Age

These conditions are known as risk factors. The more risk factors you have, the more Atherosclerosis and age it is that you'll develop atherosclerosis. You can control most risk factors and help prevent or delay atherosclerosis. Other risk factors can't be controlled.

Major Risk Factors Unhealthy blood cholesterol levels. This includes high LDL cholesterol sometimes called "bad" cholesterol and low HDL cholesterol sometimes called "good" cholesterol.

The mmHg is millimeters of mercury—the units used to measure blood pressure. Smoking can damage and tighten blood vessels, raise cholesterol levels, and raise blood pressure.

Smoking also doesn't allow enough oxygen to reach the body's tissues. This condition occurs if the body can't use its insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that helps move blood sugar into cells where it's used as an energy source.

Insulin resistance may lead to diabetes. With this disease, the body's blood sugar level is too high because the body doesn't make enough insulin or doesn't use its insulin properly. The terms "overweight" and "obesity" refer to body weight that's greater than what is considered healthy for a certain height.

Lack of physical activity. A lack of physical activity can worsen other risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as unhealthy blood cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, diabetes, and overweight and obesity.

An unhealthy diet can raise your risk for atherosclerosis. Foods that are high in saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, sodium saltand sugar can worsen other atherosclerosis risk factors.

As you get older, your risk for atherosclerosis increases. Genetic or lifestyle factors cause plaque to build up in your arteries as you age. By the time you're middle-aged or older, enough plaque has built up to cause signs or symptoms.

Introduction

In men, the risk increases after age In women, the risk increases after age Family history of early heart disease. Your risk for atherosclerosis increases if your father or a brother was diagnosed with heart disease before 55 years of age, or if your mother or a sister was diagnosed with heart disease before 65 years of age.

Although age and a family history of early heart disease are risk factors, it doesn't mean that you'll develop atherosclerosis if you have one or both.Your risk for atherosclerosis increases if your father or a brother was diagnosed with heart disease before 55 years of age, or if your mother or a sister was diagnosed with heart disease before 65 years of age.

Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular condition that affects individuals who are middle-aged and older. Atherosclerosis is a hardening and narrowing of arteries due to a build-up of cholesterols, fats, and other substances on the inside of arterial walls.

Atherosclerosis-Related Diseases

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which the inside of an artery narrows due to the build up of plaque. Initially, there are generally no symptoms. When severe, it can result in coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease, or kidney problems, depending on which arteries are affected.

Symptoms, if they occur, generally do not begin until middle age. Jan 27,  · Although the clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, appear from middle age, the process of atherosclerosis can begin early in childhood.

Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular condition that affects individuals who are middle-aged and older. Atherosclerosis is a hardening and narrowing of arteries due to a build-up of cholesterols, fats, and other substances on the inside of arterial walls.

Atherosclerosis and age

Atherosclerosis is classed as a disease of aging, such that increasing age is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis is also associated with premature biological aging, as atherosclerotic plaques show evidence of cellular senescence characterized by reduced cell proliferation, irreversible growth .

Atherosclerosis | National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)